The School Newspaper of Dobyns-Bennett High School

The Arrowhead

Homeroom Testing

Molly Turner, Assistant Editor

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Can you imagine having to take a test on the first day of school? With Dobyns Bennett’s new policy, that is what this year’s students are having to do.

DB recently began requiring their students to get a 100% on five tests about behavior before they can be released for Tribe Time. These tests measure understanding of the rules about Tribe Time, attendance, electronic devices, bullying and harassment, and student character and behavior.

Every student at Dobyns-Bennett gets one hour a day to split between lunch and Tribe Time, but in order to gain this privilege students are now required to get every question right on each test about the school rules. Many students do not feel like this is the most effective way to teach and/or remind students of what the school expects of them.

Many students are finding ways to lessen the workload of taking the quizzes. Some students don’t read through the information, and just hope for a 100%. Others get their friends to complete quizzes for them, and some are even paying people to do them. It’s a sign that homeroom testing isn’t a good way to teach students the rules when students are cheating on the test about why you shouldn’t cheat.

On another note, there are some benefits to this Tribe Time testing. These tests do have some benefits however. When students get in trouble with the principal, one of the most common responses is that they didn’t know what they did wasn’t allowed. With homeroom testing, teachers and principals can prove to the students that they told the school they understood the rules. It is also a more interactive way for students to learn about the school rules.

Although there might be some benefits to these tests, I believe that there are better ways for students to learn this information that can still be interactive. One idea is that instead of rules on Canvas, student can watch videos as a class in homeroom. They can then discuss the content and sign a form saying they’ve have viewed and understand the material. That would still hold them accountable if they break any rules, and would be a more enjoyable way to learn the school policies.

Homeroom testing is a creative way to teach the rules, but I think there are much better ways to ensure all students understand how to act while at school.

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Homeroom Testing